Mary Coronado, BSN, RN
Director of Health Services
830- 643-5783

NBISD District Seal

Health Services

Healthy Children Learn Better,
School Nurses Make it Happen!

School nursing, a specialized practice of nursing, protects and promotes student health, facilitates optimal development, and advances academic success. School nurses, grounded in ethical and evidence-based practice, are the leaders who bridge health care and education, provide care coordination, advocate for quality student-centered care, and collaborate to design systems that allow individuals and communities to develop their full potentials.

Parent & Student Resources

We deeply appreciate your cooperation and support in ensuring that NBISD remains a safe, healthy, and thriving educational environment for all students. If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact your campus administration.

Visit the Flu Vaccination Information from the Texas Department of State Health Services

The single best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year, but good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu. There also are flu antiviral drugs that can be used to treat and prevent flu.

Go Blue and Kick the Flu!  Influenza Vaccination is the most effective method for preventing illness and reducing absenteeism.  New Braunfels ISD is partnering to provide flu vaccines for our staff and students at schools.  You may also consult your physician, local pharmacy or Health Department to get vaccinated!

1. Avoid close contact.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.

2. Stay home when you are sick.

If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.  Students and staff must be fever free (less than 100.0) for 24 hours without the use of fever reducing medication before returning to school. 

3. Cover your mouth and nose.

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.

4. Clean your hands.

Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

6. Practice other good health habits.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

For more information visit the CDC.gov website or download the related CDC flyers:

Flu and You Flyer – English

Flu and You Flyer – Spanish

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have the most up-to-date information regarding the Zika Virus.  For additional information select the following links: 

For your reference, there is an Activity Book for Elementary students and a flyer about talking to your kids and protecting your family. 

Talking to Your Kids

Talking to Your Kids about Zika flyer
Talking to Your Kids about Zika flyer (Spanish)

Activity Book for Your Kids

Zika Activity Book
Zika Activity Book (Spanish)

Protect Your Family

Protect Your Family from Zika flyer
Protect Your Family from Zika flyer (Spanish)

Student Immunizations

Documents & Resources

COVID Case Manager
Melissa Leos, LVN
(830) 627-6971
CARL SCHURZ ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Ashley Woolsey, BSN, RN
(830) 627-6684
COUNTY LINE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Christina Matheson, BSN, RN
(830) 627-6617
KLEIN ROAD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Michelle Cox, RN
(830) 221-1700
LAMAR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Shaylyn Hoffman, BSN, RN
(830) 627-6894
LONE STAR EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER
Kelsey Boyd, RN
(830) 627-6829
LONG CREEK HIGH SCHOOL
Sue-Anne Evans, RN
(830) 629-8712
MEMORIAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Koty Parkinson, BSN, RN
(830) 627-6477
NEW BRAUNFELS HIGH SCHOOL
Cheri Polk, BSN RN
(830) 627-6074
Laura Dietert, LVN
(830) 627-6018
NEW BRAUNFELS MIDDLE SCHOOL
Tracy Novsek, RN
(830) 627-6282
OAK RUN MIDDLE SCHOOL
Ellen Litton-Wood, BSN, RN
(830) 627-8505
SEELE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Brittany Rodriguez, BSN RN
(830) 627-6755
VERAMENDI ELEMENTARY
Natalie Coronado, BSN RN
(830) 608-5906
VOSS FARMS ELEMENTARY
Erin Neuse, RN
(830) 608-5806
WALNUT SPRINGS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Kara Butcher RN
(830) 627-6588
 

Additional documents can be located on the NBISD Health Services Health Resources page under individual topics.  Feel free to download and print off and fax or email to the Campus Nurse.

Visit the Texas Minimum State Vaccine Requirements for Students Grade K-12.

A student shall show acceptable evidence of vaccination prior to entry, attendance, or transfer to a child-care facility or public or private elementary or secondary school in Texas.

Please provide your shot record to the School nurse if your child has received these vaccines.  Your student will not be able to receive a schedule or attend school until the shots are received and written record is provided. 

View the Texas Minimum State Vaccine Requirements for Students Grades K-12 PDF.

In addition to a current immunization record, we must have a record that shows the following vaccines have been received:

  • 1 dose of Meningococcal Vaccine (meningitis)  Meningococcal vaccinesprotect against infection with a type of bacteria that causes meningitis and blood infection (sepsis). Adolescents are at increased risk of getting this infection. This is a rare, but extremely serious disease that kills up to 10 percent of those who get it. Up to 20 percent of survivors will have serious long-term or permanent complications such as brain damage, kidney damage, deafness, or amputations. Please note that adolescents need a booster vaccine at age 16. Parents should also ask about a second type of meningococcal vaccine (meningococcal B) that may be appropriate for their child between ages 16-18 years.
  • 1 dose of Tdap Vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis) Tdap vaccine includes protection against pertussis (whooping cough), which has been on the rise in the US especially among children 10-19 years old and babies under five years old. Vaccination is important even if your child was vaccinated as an infant, because the protection from those vaccines may not last into the teen years.

Please provide your shot record to the School nurse if your child has received these vaccines.  Your student will not be able to receive a schedule or attend school until the shots are received and written record is provided. 

  • Human Papillomavirius vaccine (HPV) HPV vaccine protects against a cancer-causing infection. The HPV vaccine is recommended and is a two dose series for boys and girls age 9-14.  After the age of 15 a three-dose series over a six-month period is needed to protect both females and males. Teens or young adults who have not gotten any or all of the recommended doses should make an appointment to be vaccinated. Younger adolescents have higher antibody levels to vaccination compared to older adolescents and young adults. This may result in longer lasting immunity for those vaccinated earlier in adolescence.

General Health Information

WHAT IS MENINGITIS?

Meningitis is an inflammation of the covering of the brain and spinal cord.  It can be caused by viruses, parasites, fungi, and bacteria. Viral meningitis is most common and the least serious. Meningitis caused by bacteria is the most likely form of the disease to cause serious, long-term complications. It is an uncommon disease but requires urgent treatment with antibiotics to prevent permanent damage or death.

Bacterial meningitis can be caused by multiple organisms. Two common types are Streptococcus pneumoniae, with over 80 serogroups that can cause illness, and Neisseria meningitidis, with 5 serogroups that most commonly cause meningitis.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Someone with bacterial meningitis will become very ill. The illness may develop over one or two days, but it can also rapidly progress in a matter of hours. Not everyone with meningitis will have the same symptoms.

Children (over 1 year old) and adults with meningitis may have a severe headache, high temperature, vomiting, sensitivity to bright lights, neck stiffness, and drowsiness or confusion. In both children and adults, there may be a rash of tiny, red-purple spots. These can occur anywhere on the body.

The diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is based on a combination of symptoms and laboratory results.

HOW SERIOUS IS BACTERIAL MENINGITIS?

If it is diagnosed early and treated promptly, most people make a complete recovery. If left untreated or treatment is delayed, bacterial meningitis can be fatal, or a person may be left with permanent disability.

HOW CAN BACTERIAL MENINGITIS BE PREVENTED?

Bacterial meningitis cased by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis may be prevented through vaccination.   Vaccination with available meningococcal vaccines offers longer-term protection and is routinely recommended for adolescents and others at increased risk. 

The vaccine which protects against Streptococcus pneumoniae is called pneumococcal conjugate vaccine or PCV. There are two types of vaccinations for meningococcal disease available in the US. Meningococcal conjugate vaccines (Menactra® and Menveo®) available in the US provide protection against 4 of the 5 most common serogroups of N. meningitidis (serogroups A, C, W, and Y). Serogroup B vaccines (Trumenba® and Bexsero®) provides protection for the other most common serogroup, serogroup B. Meningococcal vaccinations are generally recommended for those beginning at 11-12 years of age with a booster between 16-18 years of age; however, for those persons at an increased risk for meningococcal disease the age recommended is different.

Depending on the brand and your age you may receive different number of doses. Approximately 2 weeks are required following vaccination for the development of protective antibody levels.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Your school nurse, family doctor, and the staff at your local or regional health department office are excellent sources for information on all infectious diseases. You may call your family doctor or local health department office to ask about meningococcal vaccine.  Additional information may also be found at the web sites for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): https://www.cdc.gov/meningitis/index.html and the Texas Department of State Health Services(DSHS): https://www.dshs.texas.gov/immunize/PreteenVaccines.aspx or
 https://dshs.texas.gov/IDCU/disease/meningitis/Meningitis.aspx      

SOURCE:

Visit the Flu Vaccination Information from the Texas Department of State Health Services

The single best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year, but good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu. There also are flu antiviral drugs that can be used to treat and prevent flu.

Go Blue and Kick the Flu!  Influenza Vaccination is the most effective method for preventing illness and reducing absenteeism.  New Braunfels ISD is partnering to provide flu vaccines for our staff and students at schools.  You may also consult your physician, local pharmacy or Health Department to get vaccinated!

1. Avoid close contact.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.

2. Stay home when you are sick.

If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.  Students and staff must be fever free (less than 100.0) for 24 hours without the use of fever reducing medication before returning to school. 

3. Cover your mouth and nose.

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.

4. Clean your hands.

Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

6. Practice other good health habits.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

For more information visit the CDC.gov website or download the related CDC flyers:

Flu and You Flyer – English

Flu and You Flyer – Spanish

DSHS Immunization Branch Advisory No. 27 – CDC Recommends Two HPV Shots for Younger Adolescents

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has updated its recommendation regarding the three injection series of HPV vaccination in adolescents, beginning at age 11-12 years. CDC now routinely recommends two doses of HPV vaccine for 11 or 12 year old’s to prevent HPV cancers.

Why does my child need HPV vaccine

HPV vaccine is important because it protects against cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is a very common virus; nearly 80 million people—about one in four—are currently infected in the United States. About 14 million people, including teens, become infected with HPV each year.

Most people with HPV never develop symptoms or health problems. Most HPV infections (9 out of 10) go away by themselves within two years. But, sometimes, HPV infections will last longer, and can cause certain cancers and other diseases. HPV infection can cause:

  • cancers of the cervix, vagina, and vulva in women;
  • cancers of the penis in men; and
  • cancers of the anus and back of the throat, including the base of the tongue and tonsils (oropharynx), in both women and men.

Every year in the United States, HPV causes 30,700 cancers in men and women. HPV vaccination can prevent most of the cancers (about 28,000) from occurring

Measles (rubeola) is a highly contagious acute viral respiratory illness. It is characterized by a prodrome of fever (as high as 105°F) and malaise, cough, coryza, and conjunctivitis – the three “C”s, Koplik spots followed by a maculopapular rash. The rash usually appears about 14 days after a person is exposed, however, the incubation ranges from 7 – 21 days. The rash characteristically spreads from the head to the trunk to the lower extremities. Patients are considered to be contagious from 4 days before to 4 days after the rash appears. Please note that immunocompromised patients may not develop the rash. Complications can include otitis media, diarrhea, bronchitis, pneumonia, encephalitis, seizures and death.

While it is rare that vaccinated individuals develop measles, it does happen. Vaccinated individuals may have an atypical clinical presentation—typically shorter rash duration or atypical rash presentation, and possible lack of fever, cough, coryza or conjunctivitis. People at high risk for severe illness and complications from measles include: infants and children <5 years, adults aged >20 years, pregnant women, and those with compromised immune systems.

Department of State Health Services Infectious Disease Control

Fact Sheet English

Fact Sheet Spanish

Get Your Free Texas Prescription Card Here

As a resident of Texas, you and your family have access to a statewide Prescription Assistance Program (PAP).  Create and print your FREE discount prescription drug card coupon.  The pharmacy coupon card will provide you with Rx medication savings of up to 75% at more than 68,000 pharmacies across the country including CVS, Walgreens and Walmart. 

Create and print your FREE discount prescription drug card coupon here.

As summer arrives, so do mosquitoes!  Mosquito activity increases with warmer weather, and so does the threat of illness. Pregnant women are particularly at risk of Zika; the virus can cause birth defects in unborn infants. The Zika virus spreads through the bite of certain types of mosquitoes. While it can cause fever, rash, joint pain, and red or pink eyes, about 80 percent of people with Zika do not become ill or have symptoms. Zika can also spread through blood transfusions and sexual contact. . Prevent mosquito breeding and protect yourself from mosquito bites. You can learn more about Zika in Texas here

Listed below are some steps to help prevent mosquito-borne illnesses.

  • Apply EPA-approved insect repellent.
  • Wear pants and long-sleeve shirts
  • Remove standing water in and around your home 
  • Cover trash cans or containers where water can collect
  • Talk to your doctor if you have concerns  

For additional information on Zika in Comal County visit Zika in Central Texas.  

View the Zika Virus Protection and Prevention Info Sheet from TEA

The Zika informational poster from the Texas Department of Health and Human services can be found at: https://www.texaszika.org/materials/ZikaPoster11x17English.pdf

Employee Wellness

About NB Strong

NB Strong is NBISD’s Employee Wellness initiative to serve as a resource for health and wellness. “Healthy employees are more productive, have more energy and better manage stress. Employee wellness programs can keep your staff healthy,  ecrease sick days, lower insurance costs, and increase employee retention. Healthy employees are just as important as healthy students, especially in their ability to be a model of health for students” – Alliance for a Healthier Generation

Coming Soon: Information for the Immunization Clinic for all NBISD employees.  Link here for a location near you!  GetMyFluShot.org

The following tentative list shows vaccines that  will be available:

  • Quadrivalent Flu – Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every year as the best way to reduce the risk of flu and its potentially serious complications.
  • Gardasil (Humanpapillomavirus Vaccine ages 26-45) HPV vaccines protect against human papillomavirus causing cancers!
  • Hepatitis A  Hepatitis A is a highly contagious liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus.                             
  • Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B is transmitted when blood, semen, or other body fluid from a person infected with the hepatitis B virus enters the body of someone who is not infected.
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella Should adults receive the MMR vaccine? Adults wo do not have evidence of immunity should get at least one dose of MMR.
  • Meningitis CDC recommends for adults with immune disorder and other at risk populations.   
  • Shingles (Shingrix ages 50-64) You don’t want shingles so be sure and get the vaccine if you’re >50!!  The herpes zoster vaccine is recommended for adults 50 years and older.
  • Tetanus Diptheria with Pertussis (Tdap) The Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis) vaccine is recommended for women during each pregnancy and once for all adults who have not previously received it.
  •  Vitamin B 12 ($20 additional fee applies) A supplement of Cyanocobalamin Injection.   

If you received routine vaccinations from Staying Healthy Medical Services in previous years and need a copy of your records, please email info@stayinghealthymedical.com.   In the email you will need to include your name and birthdate.  Depending on the carrier, insurance claims may be filed as Community Health and Immunization Services or Staying Healthy Medical Services.

Tips for Teachers from the CDC

  • Allow access to drinking water
  • Allow students to bring water bottles to class
  • Use student rewards that support health
  • Use non food items, activities and opportunities for physical activity
  • Do not use food, beverages or candy to reward achievement or behavior. 
  • Do not withhold food, beverages or physical activity time for discipline. 

Ideas for Nonfood Rewards

Program Offerings

Health Matters Health Screening for Employees

New Braunfels ISD employees had the opportunity to take part in a blood health screening conducted by Health Matters. over the past years.  Health Matters is no longer offering this service. Questions regarding results please contact Health Matters at viri@wellnessandhealthmatters.com or wellnessandhealthmatters.com or call 972-613- 5793 and toll free 1-888- 399-4317, fax at 972-613-7236. 

Keep Flu out of School!

The single best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year, but good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu. There also are flu antiviral drugs that can be used to treat and prevent flu.

1. Avoid close contact.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.

2. Stay home when you are sick.

If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.

3. Cover your mouth and nose.

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.

4. Clean your hands.

Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

6. Practice other good health habits.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

For more information, visit the CDC.gov website.

Free Counseling Sessions

Employee Assistance Program with Lincoln – this is a free service available for all part-time and full-time employees (regardless if the employee has benefits with NBISD).  The EAP allows employees to receive 5 free counseling sessions, per person in the household, per problem, per year.  Benefit plan year runs 09/01-08/31.

Crisis Intervention

Mobile Crisis Outreach Team (MCOT) Emergency Crisis Line 877-466-0660

National Suicide Prevention LifeLine  1-800-273-8255  Nacional de Prevencion del Suicidio 1-888-628-9454 

New Braunfels Police Victim Services Crime Victim Liason lzabel@nbtexas.org 830-221-4574

Victim of Sexual Assault: What to do Contact Crisis Center of Comal County 800-500-6666

Community Resources

Crisis Center of Comal County CCCC, Crisis Line 830-620-4357, 1-800-434-8013

Hill Country MHDD Mental Health and Developmental Disability 830-792-3300

MAPNB (Mental Advocacy Partners) – New Braunfels

National Human Trafficking Resources Center and hotline  1-888-3737-888 OR text be free to 233733

River City Advocacy  830-643-0200

Warning Signs of Alcoholism

It’s a win- win!  Be NB Strong!

FAQ

How to Keep Your Child Healthy and Happy

One of the most important lessons a child can learn is how to lead a healthy life.

  • Provide a balanced diet with healthy snacks. Breakfast is a good start!
  • Provide adequate rest, sleep and exercise.
  • Teach good personal hygiene. Wash hands with soap and water often. 
  • Be aware of his or her developmental milestones and maturity.
  • Make sure your child has regular medical and eye check-ups and scheduled immunizations. Visit the Dentist.
  • Provide protection and firm, consistent discipline but encourage independence.
  • Listen to your child and help him or her handle stress, worry, loneliness, anger – these may cause headaches, stomachaches and sleeplessness, and may lead to depression or other illnesses.
  • Consult your physician for any special needs or concerns.

Give lots of Tender Loving Care!

School Health Screening Programs Conducted in NBISD:

  • Texas Risk Assessment for Type II Diabetes in Children: Grades 1,3,5,7
  • Vision Screening: Grades PK, K, 1, 3, 5, 7 & new students
  • Hearing Screening: Grades PK, K, 1, 3, 5, 7 & new students
  • Spinal Screening: Grades 5 girls, 7th grade girls and 8th grade boys

The school nurse will notify the parents if a problem is identified in any of the screenings. Should you need any information or assistance concerning your child’s health, development and/or screening, please call the nurse at your child’s school.

A student shall show acceptable evidence of vaccination prior to entry, attendance, or transfer to a child-care facility or public or private elementary or secondary school in Texas.

Students entering 7th grade Immunization Requirements

We must have a current record that shows the following vaccines have been received:

  • 1 dose of Meningococcal Vaccine (meningitis)
  • 2 doses of Varicella Vaccine (chicken pox)
  • 1 dose of Tdap Vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis)
  •  2 doses of Humanpapilloma virus (HPV) vaccine are suggested.

Please provide your shot record to the School nurse if your child has received these vaccines.  Your student will not be able to receive a schedule or attend school until the shots are received and written record is provided. 

Texas Minimum State Vaccine Requirements for Students Grade K-12

School Health Advisory Council

The purpose of the New Braunfels ISD School Health Advisory Committee (SHAC) is to advise the Board of Trustees on various subjects as they relate to the health of students, parents, teachers, employees and community members of New Braunfels ISD.

SHAC is a group of individuals representative of segments of the community, generally appointed by the district Board of Trustees to serve at the district level. They provide advice on coordinated school health programming and its impact on student health and learning. SHAC’s provide recommendations specific to changes and/or additions to the school’s health education curriculum or instruction that impact the entire school district, not just individual school campuses. School districts use a SHAC to advise them on a variety of topics. It is important to emphasize that SHAC’s provide advice and can only make recommendations to the school district Board of Trustees. They are not part of the paid administrative staff or structure of the schools; nor do they have any legal reponsibilities within the school district. However, Texas law requires that every school district have a SHAC and the majority of members must be parents not employed by the school district.

The most effective SHAC’s develop plans that address all eight components of a coordinated school health program including: Health Instruction, Healthy School Environment, Health Services, Physical Education, School Counseling, Food service, School Site Health Promotion for Faculty and Staff and Involvement with Parents and the Community.

NBISD SHAC Vision Statement:  New Braunfels ISD will have healthier students, staff and families through awareness, support, and implementation of our Coordinated Health Program through the following eight components:  1. Health instruction, 2. Healthy school environment,  3. Health services,  4. Physical education,  5. School counseling,  6. Food service,  7. School site health promotion for faculty and staff; and,  8. Involvement with parents and the community.
   
NBISD SHAC Mission Statement:  Our mission is to promote healthy lifestyle choices, create a climate of wellness and safety for students and families in the NBISD community, and to help the District ensure that local community values and health issues are reflected in the District’s health education instruction. 

NBISD SHAC Bylaws

87(R) HB 1525 additions to SHAC

FFA (Legal)

FFA (Local)

SHAC has developed a Wellness Plan (Revision 4/28/21) in order to implement FFA (Local). This plan supports Nutrition Promotion and Education, Physical Activity Promotion and Education, as well as School and Staff Wellness.

The close of the 80th Legislative Session resulted in the passage of House Bill (HB) 1059, which requires the Texas Department of State Health Services to create a List of the required immunizations for school attendance and a list of the recommended vaccinations. 

Proposed Rules for School Nutrition
DSHS SHAC Guide (2021 update)
School Health Requirements, beginning 2009/2010 School Year 

Please contact: 

Mary Coronado, BSN, RN
NBISD Director of Health Services
NBISD Administration Center
1000 N. Walnut, New Braunfels TX 78130 

830-643-5783

SHAC Summary Reports

The purpose of the New Braunfels ISD School Health Advisory Committee (SHAC) is to advise the Board of Trustees on various subjects as they relate to the health of students, parents, teachers, employees and community members of New Braunfels ISD.

Health Services

Healthy Children Learn Better,
School Nurses Make it Happen!

School nursing, a specialized practice of nursing, protects and promotes student health, facilitates optimal development, and advances academic success. School nurses, grounded in ethical and evidence-based practice, are the leaders who bridge health care and education, provide care coordination, advocate for quality student-centered care, and collaborate to design systems that allow individuals and communities to develop their full potentials.

Mary Coronado, BSN, RN

Director of Health Services
830- 643-5783

Parent & Student Resources

We deeply appreciate your cooperation and support in ensuring that NBISD remains a safe, healthy, and thriving educational environment for all students. If you have any questions or concerns, please don’t hesitate to contact your campus administration.

Visit the Flu Vaccination Information from the Texas Department of State Health Services

The single best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year, but good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu. There also are flu antiviral drugs that can be used to treat and prevent flu.

Go Blue and Kick the Flu!  Influenza Vaccination is the most effective method for preventing illness and reducing absenteeism.  New Braunfels ISD is partnering to provide flu vaccines for our staff and students at schools.  You may also consult your physician, local pharmacy or Health Department to get vaccinated!

1. Avoid close contact.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.

2. Stay home when you are sick.

If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.  Students and staff must be fever free (less than 100.0) for 24 hours without the use of fever reducing medication before returning to school. 

3. Cover your mouth and nose.

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.

4. Clean your hands.

Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

6. Practice other good health habits.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

For more information visit the CDC.gov website or download the related CDC flyers:

Flu and You Flyer – English

Flu and You Flyer – Spanish

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have the most up-to-date information regarding the Zika Virus.  For additional information select the following links: 

For your reference, there is an Activity Book for Elementary students and a flyer about talking to your kids and protecting your family. 

Talking to Your Kids

Talking to Your Kids about Zika flyer
Talking to Your Kids about Zika flyer (Spanish)

Activity Book for Your Kids

Zika Activity Book
Zika Activity Book (Spanish)

Protect Your Family

Protect Your Family from Zika flyer
Protect Your Family from Zika flyer (Spanish)

Documents & Resources

COVID Case Manager
Melissa Leos, LVN
(830) 627-6971

CARL SCHURZ ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Ashley Woolsey, BSN, RN
(830) 627-6684

COUNTY LINE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Christina Matheson, BSN, RN
(830) 627-6617

KLEIN ROAD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Michelle Cox, RN
(830) 221-1700

LAMAR ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Shaylyn Hoffman, BSN, RN
(830) 627-6894

LONE STAR EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER
Kelsey Boyd, RN
(830) 627-6829

LONG CREEK HIGH SCHOOL
Sue-Anne Evans, RN
(830) 629-8712

MEMORIAL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Koty Parkinson, BSN, RN
(830) 627-6477

NEW BRAUNFELS HIGH SCHOOL
Cheri Polk, BSN RN
(830) 627-6074
Laura Dietert, LVN
(830) 627-6018

NEW BRAUNFELS MIDDLE SCHOOL
Tracy Novsek, RN
(830) 627-6282

OAK RUN MIDDLE SCHOOL
Ellen Litton-Wood, BSN, RN
(830) 627-8505

SEELE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Brittany Rodriguez, BSN RN
(830) 627-6755

VERAMENDI ELEMENTARY
Natalie Coronado, BSN RN
(830) 608-5906

VOSS FARMS ELEMENTARY
Erin Neuse, RN
(830) 608-5806

WALNUT SPRINGS ELEMENTARY SCHOOL
Kara Butcher RN
(830) 627-6588

Additional documents can be located on the NBISD Health Services Health Resources page under individual topics.  Feel free to download and print off and fax or email to the Campus Nurse.

Visit the Texas Minimum State Vaccine Requirements for Students Grade K-12.

A student shall show acceptable evidence of vaccination prior to entry, attendance, or transfer to a child-care facility or public or private elementary or secondary school in Texas.

Please provide your shot record to the School nurse if your child has received these vaccines.  Your student will not be able to receive a schedule or attend school until the shots are received and written record is provided. 

View the Texas Minimum State Vaccine Requirements for Students Grades K-12 PDF.

In addition to a current immunization record, we must have a record that shows the following vaccines have been received:

  • 1 dose of Meningococcal Vaccine (meningitis) protects against infection with a type of bacteria that causes meningitis and blood infection (sepsis). Adolescents are at increased risk of getting this infection. This is a rare, but extremely serious disease that kills up to 10 percent of those who get it. Up to 20 percent of survivors will have serious long-term or permanent complications such as brain damage, kidney damage, deafness, or amputations. Please note that adolescents need a booster vaccine at age 16. Parents should also ask about a second type of meningococcal vaccine (meningococcal B) that may be appropriate for their child between ages 16-18 years.
  • 1 dose of Tdap Vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis) includes protection against pertussis (whooping cough), which has been on the rise in the US especially among children 10-19 years old and babies under five years old. Vaccination is important even if your child was vaccinated as an infant, because the protection from those vaccines may not last into the teen years.

Please provide your shot record to the School nurse if your child has received these vaccines.  Your student will not be able to receive a schedule or attend school until the shots are received and written record is provided. 

  • Human Papillomavirius vaccine (HPV) HPV vaccine protects against a cancer-causing infection. The HPV vaccine is recommended and is a two dose series for boys and girls age 9-14.  After the age of 15 a three-dose series over a six-month period is needed to protect both females and males. Teens or young adults who have not gotten any or all of the recommended doses should make an appointment to be vaccinated. Younger adolescents have higher antibody levels to vaccination compared to older adolescents and young adults. This may result in longer lasting immunity for those vaccinated earlier in adolescence.

General Health Information

WHAT IS MENINGITIS?

Meningitis is an inflammation of the covering of the brain and spinal cord.  It can be caused by viruses, parasites, fungi, and bacteria. Viral meningitis is most common and the least serious. Meningitis caused by bacteria is the most likely form of the disease to cause serious, long-term complications. It is an uncommon disease but requires urgent treatment with antibiotics to prevent permanent damage or death.

Bacterial meningitis can be caused by multiple organisms. Two common types are Streptococcus pneumoniae, with over 80 serogroups that can cause illness, and Neisseria meningitidis, with 5 serogroups that most commonly cause meningitis.

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS?

Someone with bacterial meningitis will become very ill. The illness may develop over one or two days, but it can also rapidly progress in a matter of hours. Not everyone with meningitis will have the same symptoms.

Children (over 1 year old) and adults with meningitis may have a severe headache, high temperature, vomiting, sensitivity to bright lights, neck stiffness, and drowsiness or confusion. In both children and adults, there may be a rash of tiny, red-purple spots. These can occur anywhere on the body.

The diagnosis of bacterial meningitis is based on a combination of symptoms and laboratory results.

HOW SERIOUS IS BACTERIAL MENINGITIS?

If it is diagnosed early and treated promptly, most people make a complete recovery. If left untreated or treatment is delayed, bacterial meningitis can be fatal, or a person may be left with permanent disability.

HOW CAN BACTERIAL MENINGITIS BE PREVENTED?

Bacterial meningitis cased by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis may be prevented through vaccination.   Vaccination with available meningococcal vaccines offers longer-term protection and is routinely recommended for adolescents and others at increased risk. 

The vaccine which protects against Streptococcus pneumoniae is called pneumococcal conjugate vaccine or PCV. There are two types of vaccinations for meningococcal disease available in the US. Meningococcal conjugate vaccines (Menactra® and Menveo®) available in the US provide protection against 4 of the 5 most common serogroups of N. meningitidis (serogroups A, C, W, and Y). Serogroup B vaccines (Trumenba® and Bexsero®) provides protection for the other most common serogroup, serogroup B. Meningococcal vaccinations are generally recommended for those beginning at 11-12 years of age with a booster between 16-18 years of age; however, for those persons at an increased risk for meningococcal disease the age recommended is different.

Depending on the brand and your age you may receive different number of doses. Approximately 2 weeks are required following vaccination for the development of protective antibody levels.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Your school nurse, family doctor, and the staff at your local or regional health department office are excellent sources for information on all infectious diseases. You may call your family doctor or local health department office to ask about meningococcal vaccine.  Additional information may also be found at the web sites for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): https://www.cdc.gov/meningitis/index.html and the Texas Department of State Health Services(DSHS): https://www.dshs.texas.gov/immunize/PreteenVaccines.aspx or
 https://dshs.texas.gov/IDCU/disease/meningitis/Meningitis.aspx      

SOURCE:

Visit the Flu Vaccination Information from the Texas Department of State Health Services

The single best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year, but good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu. There also are flu antiviral drugs that can be used to treat and prevent flu.

Go Blue and Kick the Flu!  Influenza Vaccination is the most effective method for preventing illness and reducing absenteeism.  New Braunfels ISD is partnering to provide flu vaccines for our staff and students at schools.  You may also consult your physician, local pharmacy or Health Department to get vaccinated!

1. Avoid close contact.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.

2. Stay home when you are sick.

If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.  Students and staff must be fever free (less than 100.0) for 24 hours without the use of fever reducing medication before returning to school. 

3. Cover your mouth and nose.

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.

4. Clean your hands.

Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

6. Practice other good health habits.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

For more information visit the CDC.gov website or download the related CDC flyers:

Flu and You Flyer – English

Flu and You Flyer – Spanish

DSHS Immunization Branch Advisory No. 27 – CDC Recommends Two HPV Shots for Younger Adolescents

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has updated its recommendation regarding the three injection series of HPV vaccination in adolescents, beginning at age 11-12 years. CDC now routinely recommends two doses of HPV vaccine for 11 or 12 year old’s to prevent HPV cancers.

Why does my child need HPV vaccine

HPV vaccine is important because it protects against cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. HPV is a very common virus; nearly 80 million people—about one in four—are currently infected in the United States. About 14 million people, including teens, become infected with HPV each year.

Most people with HPV never develop symptoms or health problems. Most HPV infections (9 out of 10) go away by themselves within two years. But, sometimes, HPV infections will last longer, and can cause certain cancers and other diseases. HPV infection can cause:

  • cancers of the cervix, vagina, and vulva in women;
  • cancers of the penis in men; and
  • cancers of the anus and back of the throat, including the base of the tongue and tonsils (oropharynx), in both women and men.

Every year in the United States, HPV causes 30,700 cancers in men and women. HPV vaccination can prevent most of the cancers (about 28,000) from occurring

Measles (rubeola) is a highly contagious acute viral respiratory illness. It is characterized by a prodrome of fever (as high as 105°F) and malaise, cough, coryza, and conjunctivitis – the three “C”s, Koplik spots followed by a maculopapular rash. The rash usually appears about 14 days after a person is exposed, however, the incubation ranges from 7 – 21 days. The rash characteristically spreads from the head to the trunk to the lower extremities. Patients are considered to be contagious from 4 days before to 4 days after the rash appears. Please note that immunocompromised patients may not develop the rash. Complications can include otitis media, diarrhea, bronchitis, pneumonia, encephalitis, seizures and death.

While it is rare that vaccinated individuals develop measles, it does happen. Vaccinated individuals may have an atypical clinical presentation—typically shorter rash duration or atypical rash presentation, and possible lack of fever, cough, coryza or conjunctivitis. People at high risk for severe illness and complications from measles include: infants and children <5 years, adults aged >20 years, pregnant women, and those with compromised immune systems.

Department of State Health Services Infectious Disease Control

Fact Sheet English

Fact Sheet Spanish

Get Your Free Texas Prescription Card Here

As a resident of Texas, you and your family have access to a statewide Prescription Assistance Program (PAP).  Create and print your FREE discount prescription drug card coupon.  The pharmacy coupon card will provide you with Rx medication savings of up to 75% at more than 68,000 pharmacies across the country including CVS, Walgreens and Walmart. 

Create and print your FREE discount prescription drug card coupon here.

As summer arrives, so do mosquitoes!  Mosquito activity increases with warmer weather, and so does the threat of illness. Pregnant women are particularly at risk of Zika; the virus can cause birth defects in unborn infants. The Zika virus spreads through the bite of certain types of mosquitoes. While it can cause fever, rash, joint pain, and red or pink eyes, about 80 percent of people with Zika do not become ill or have symptoms. Zika can also spread through blood transfusions and sexual contact. . Prevent mosquito breeding and protect yourself from mosquito bites. You can learn more about Zika in Texas here

Listed below are some steps to help prevent mosquito-borne illnesses.

  • Apply EPA-approved insect repellent.
  • Wear pants and long-sleeve shirts
  • Remove standing water in and around your home 
  • Cover trash cans or containers where water can collect
  • Talk to your doctor if you have concerns  

For additional information on Zika in Comal County visit Zika in Central Texas.  

View the Zika Virus Protection and Prevention Info Sheet from TEA

The Zika informational poster from the Texas Department of Health and Human services can be found at: https://www.texaszika.org/materials/ZikaPoster11x17English.pdf

Employee Wellness

About NB Strong

NB Strong is NBISD’s Employee Wellness initiative to serve as a resource for health and wellness. “Healthy employees are more productive, have more energy and better manage stress. Employee wellness programs can keep your staff healthy,  ecrease sick days, lower insurance costs, and increase employee retention. Healthy employees are just as important as healthy students, especially in their ability to be a model of health for students” – Alliance for a Healthier Generation

Coming Soon: Information for the Immunization Clinic for all NBISD employees.  Link here for a location near you!  GetMyFluShot.org

The following tentative list shows vaccines that  will be available:

  • Quadrivalent Flu – Everyone 6 months and older should get a flu vaccine every year as the best way to reduce the risk of flu and its potentially serious complications.
  • Gardasil (Humanpapillomavirus Vaccine ages 26-45) HPV vaccines protect against human papillomavirus causing cancers!
  • Hepatitis A  Hepatitis A is a highly contagious liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus.                             
  • Hepatitis B Hepatitis B is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Hepatitis B is transmitted when blood, semen, or other body fluid from a person infected with the hepatitis B virus enters the body of someone who is not infected.
  • Measles, Mumps, Rubella Should adults receive the MMR vaccine? Adults wo do not have evidence of immunity should get at least one dose of MMR.
  • Meningitis CDC recommends for adults with immune disorder and other at risk populations.   
  • Shingles (Shingrix ages 50-64) You don’t want shingles so be sure and get the vaccine if you’re >50!!  The herpes zoster vaccine is recommended for adults 50 years and older.
  • Tetanus Diptheria with Pertussis (Tdap) The Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis) vaccine is recommended for women during each pregnancy and once for all adults who have not previously received it.
  •  Vitamin B 12 ($20 additional fee applies) A supplement of Cyanocobalamin Injection.   

If you received routine vaccinations from Staying Healthy Medical Services in previous years and need a copy of your records, please email info@stayinghealthymedical.com.   In the email you will need to include your name and birthdate.  Depending on the carrier, insurance claims may be filed as Community Health and Immunization Services or Staying Healthy Medical Services.

Tips for Teachers from the CDC

  • Allow access to drinking water
  • Allow students to bring water bottles to class
  • Use student rewards that support health
  • Use non food items, activities and opportunities for physical activity
  • Do not use food, beverages or candy to reward achievement or behavior. 
  • Do not withhold food, beverages or physical activity time for discipline. 

Ideas for Nonfood Rewards

Program Offerings

Health Matters Health Screening for Employees

New Braunfels ISD employees had the opportunity to take part in a blood health screening conducted by Health Matters. over the past years.  Health Matters is no longer offering this service. Questions regarding results please contact Health Matters at viri@wellnessandhealthmatters.com or wellnessandhealthmatters.com or call 972-613- 5793 and toll free 1-888- 399-4317, fax at 972-613-7236. 

Keep Flu out of School!

The single best way to prevent seasonal flu is to get vaccinated each year, but good health habits like covering your cough and washing your hands often can help stop the spread of germs and prevent respiratory illnesses like the flu. There also are flu antiviral drugs that can be used to treat and prevent flu.

1. Avoid close contact.

Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.

2. Stay home when you are sick.

If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. This will help prevent spreading your illness to others.

3. Cover your mouth and nose.

Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.

4. Clean your hands.

Washing your hands often will help protect you from germs. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.

5. Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.

Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.

6. Practice other good health habits.

Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

For more information, visit the CDC.gov website.

Free Counseling Sessions

Employee Assistance Program with Lincoln – this is a free service available for all part-time and full-time employees (regardless if the employee has benefits with NBISD).  The EAP allows employees to receive 5 free counseling sessions, per person in the household, per problem, per year.  Benefit plan year runs 09/01-08/31.

Crisis Intervention

Mobile Crisis Outreach Team (MCOT) Emergency Crisis Line 877-466-0660

National Suicide Prevention LifeLine  1-800-273-8255  Nacional de Prevencion del Suicidio 1-888-628-9454 

New Braunfels Police Victim Services Crime Victim Liason lzabel@nbtexas.org 830-221-4574

Victim of Sexual Assault: What to do Contact Crisis Center of Comal County 800-500-6666

Community Resources

Crisis Center of Comal County CCCC, Crisis Line 830-620-4357, 1-800-434-8013

Hill Country MHDD Mental Health and Developmental Disability 830-792-3300

MAPNB (Mental Advocacy Partners) – New Braunfels

National Human Trafficking Resources Center and hotline  1-888-3737-888 OR text be free to 233733

River City Advocacy  830-643-0200

Warning Signs of Alcoholism

It’s a win- win!  Be NB Strong!

FAQ

How to Keep Your Child Healthy and Happy

One of the most important lessons a child can learn is how to lead a healthy life.

  • Provide a balanced diet with healthy snacks. Breakfast is a good start!
  • Provide adequate rest, sleep and exercise.
  • Teach good personal hygiene. Wash hands with soap and water often. 
  • Be aware of his or her developmental milestones and maturity.
  • Make sure your child has regular medical and eye check-ups and scheduled immunizations. Visit the Dentist.
  • Provide protection and firm, consistent discipline but encourage independence.
  • Listen to your child and help him or her handle stress, worry, loneliness, anger – these may cause headaches, stomachaches and sleeplessness, and may lead to depression or other illnesses.
  • Consult your physician for any special needs or concerns.

Give lots of Tender Loving Care!

School Health Screening Programs Conducted in NBISD:

  • Texas Risk Assessment for Type II Diabetes in Children: Grades 1,3,5,7
  • Vision Screening: Grades PK, K, 1, 3, 5, 7 & new students
  • Hearing Screening: Grades PK, K, 1, 3, 5, 7 & new students
  • Spinal Screening: Grades 5 girls, 7th grade girls and 8th grade boys

The school nurse will notify the parents if a problem is identified in any of the screenings. Should you need any information or assistance concerning your child’s health, development and/or screening, please call the nurse at your child’s school.

A student shall show acceptable evidence of vaccination prior to entry, attendance, or transfer to a child-care facility or public or private elementary or secondary school in Texas.

Students entering 7th grade Immunization Requirements

We must have a current record that shows the following vaccines have been received:

  • 1 dose of Meningococcal Vaccine (meningitis)
  • 2 doses of Varicella Vaccine (chicken pox)
  • 1 dose of Tdap Vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis)
  •  2 doses of Humanpapilloma virus (HPV) vaccine are suggested.

Please provide your shot record to the School nurse if your child has received these vaccines.  Your student will not be able to receive a schedule or attend school until the shots are received and written record is provided. 

Texas Minimum State Vaccine Requirements for Students Grade K-12

School Health Advisory Council

The purpose of the New Braunfels ISD School Health Advisory Committee (SHAC) is to advise the Board of Trustees on various subjects as they relate to the health of students, parents, teachers, employees and community members of New Braunfels ISD.

SHAC is a group of individuals representative of segments of the community, generally appointed by the district Board of Trustees to serve at the district level. They provide advice on coordinated school health programming and its impact on student health and learning. SHAC’s provide recommendations specific to changes and/or additions to the school’s health education curriculum or instruction that impact the entire school district, not just individual school campuses. School districts use a SHAC to advise them on a variety of topics. It is important to emphasize that SHAC’s provide advice and can only make recommendations to the school district Board of Trustees. They are not part of the paid administrative staff or structure of the schools; nor do they have any legal reponsibilities within the school district. However, Texas law requires that every school district have a SHAC and the majority of members must be parents not employed by the school district.

The most effective SHAC’s develop plans that address all eight components of a coordinated school health program including: Health Instruction, Healthy School Environment, Health Services, Physical Education, School Counseling, Food service, School Site Health Promotion for Faculty and Staff and Involvement with Parents and the Community.

NBISD SHAC Vision Statement:  New Braunfels ISD will have healthier students, staff and families through awareness, support, and implementation of our Coordinated Health Program through the following eight components:  1. Health instruction, 2. Healthy school environment,  3. Health services,  4. Physical education,  5. School counseling,  6. Food service,  7. School site health promotion for faculty and staff; and,  8. Involvement with parents and the community.
   
NBISD SHAC Mission Statement:  Our mission is to promote healthy lifestyle choices, create a climate of wellness and safety for students and families in the NBISD community, and to help the District ensure that local community values and health issues are reflected in the District’s health education instruction. 

NBISD SHAC Bylaws

87(R) HB 1525 additions to SHAC

FFA (Legal)

FFA (Local)

SHAC has developed a Wellness Plan (Revision 4/28/21) in order to implement FFA (Local). This plan supports Nutrition Promotion and Education, Physical Activity Promotion and Education, as well as School and Staff Wellness.

The close of the 80th Legislative Session resulted in the passage of House Bill (HB) 1059, which requires the Texas Department of State Health Services to create a List of the required immunizations for school attendance and a list of the recommended vaccinations. 

Proposed Rules for School Nutrition
DSHS SHAC Guide (2021 update)
School Health Requirements, beginning 2009/2010 School Year 

Please contact: 

Mary Coronado, BSN, RN
NBISD Director of Health Services
NBISD Administration Center
1000 N. Walnut, New Braunfels TX 78130 

830-643-5783

SHAC Summary Reports

The purpose of the New Braunfels ISD School Health Advisory Committee (SHAC) is to advise the Board of Trustees on various subjects as they relate to the health of students, parents, teachers, employees and community members of New Braunfels ISD.