Student Services

The Department of Student Services provides a variety of support programs for NBISD students and their families.

Handbooks

Feeder Patterns

LCHS

Matthew DeLoach
Chief of Schools
LCHS Feeder Pattern
830-643-5704
  • County Line Elementary School
  • Klein Road Elementary School
  • Memorial Elementary School
  • Voss Farms Elementary School
  • Walnut Springs Elementary School
  • New Braunfels Middle School
  • Long Creek High School

NBHS

Wade Ivy
Chief of Schools
NBHS Feeder Pattern
830-643-5704
  • Carl Schurz Elementary School
  • Lamar Elementary School
  • Seele Elementary School
  • Veramendi Elementary School
  • Oak Run Middle School
  • New Braunfels High School

Shared campuses from both feeder patterns

  • Lone Star Early Childhood Center
  • School of Choice
  • DAEP

Department Functions

  • Scorecard Development and Support
  • Coaching 1:1
  • Support of Principal Collaboration Opportunities
  • Operational Leadership Meetings
  • TPESS Texas Principal Evaluation and Support Systems
    • Goal Setting
  • Onboarding and mentoring support to new to district staff in School Leadership and Student Services
  • Customer Service Support for Parents, Community Members, Staff
  • Assistant Principal Support
  • Discipline/Student Supportive Measures
  • Staff Development
  • Investigations
  • Grievances
  • Attendance/ Registration/ Enrollment
  • Community Partnerships

The Student Services department oversees the following areas:

  • Athletics
  • Counseling
  • Health Services
  • Restorative Discipline Team
  • School Safety

Maria’s Closet

Open to all families in need of school supplies, backpacks, & new/gently used clothing.

Maria Cendejas-Alcala

407 W. Mill St.,
New Braunfels, TX 78130
830-643-5736

Tuesday – Friday
9am – 12pm
1pm – 3pm

School Supply Donations Needed:

  • Glue sticks
  • Crayons (24 count)
  • Prong plastic folders with pockets in solid colors (avoid black)
  • Tray of water colors (8 count)
  • Bottles of glue (4 ounce)
  • Metal scissors (pointed)
  • Package highlighters
  • Composition books
  • Wide-ruled notebook paper
  • Color pencils
  • Large pink eraser
  • Tennis shoes
  • Boys and girls backpacks for Kinder to Fifth Grade

NBISD Safe-T Program

SAFE-T: Students and Families Experiencing Transition

Our program works with students and families meeting criteria for the McKinney-Vento Act implemented to ensure all students have the right to an education regardless of their living situation. The McKinney-Vento Act is a federal law that provides services to these students. The program provides services to help these students immediately enroll in school and have equitable access to education and opportunities for success.

Program Goals

  • To be able to provide services to an increasing number of NBISD students under the McKinney-Vento Act.
  • Maintain partnerships with our many community resource collaborators.
  • Align service strategies that are student-centered and designed to best meet the academic needs of students, ensuring they reach their full potential.

Our Mission

The mission of  SAFE-T is to discover the full potential of transitioning students by engaging, empowering, and inspiring them through educational support, stability, and barrier-breaking tools.

If your family is currently living in transition due to economic hardship, a natural disaster, fire, loss of housing, job loss, or any other life-altering situation, please contact the SAFE-T team to locate resources to best assist you and your child.

Help make a difference in our community:
Volunteer Now!

Safe-T Team
Maria Alcala
District Homeless/
Foster Liaison
830-643-5736
Rosalie Rosales
SAFE-T Program,
Dropout Prevention
830-627-6013
Jennifer Martin
Homeless Identification
Specialist
830-643-5797
Safe-T FAQ

How to Keep Your Child Healthy and Happy

One of the most important lessons a child can learn is how to lead a healthy life.

  • Provide a balanced diet with healthy snacks. Breakfast is a good start!
  • Provide adequate rest, sleep and exercise.
  • Teach good personal hygiene. Wash hands with soap and water often.
  • Be aware of his or her developmental milestones and maturity.
  • Make sure your child has regular medical and eye check-ups and scheduled immunizations. Visit the Dentist.
  • Provide protection and firm, consistent discipline but encourage independence.
  • Listen to your child and help him or her handle stress, worry, loneliness, anger – these may cause headaches, stomachaches and sleeplessness, and may lead to depression or other illnesses.
  • Consult your physician for any special needs or concerns.

Give lots of Tender Loving Care!

School Health Screening Programs Conducted in NBISD:

  • Texas Risk Assessment for Type II Diabetes in Children: Grades 1,3,5,7
  • Vision Screening: Grades PK, K, 1, 3, 5, 7 & new students
  • Hearing Screening: Grades PK, K, 1, 3, 5, 7 & new students
  • Spinal Screening: Grades 5 girls, 7th grade girls and 8th grade boys

The school nurse will notify the parents if a problem is identified in any of the screenings. Should you need any information or assistance concerning your child’s health, development and/or screening, please call the nurse at your child’s school.

A student shall show acceptable evidence of vaccination prior to entry, attendance, or transfer to a child-care facility or public or private elementary or secondary school in Texas.

Students entering 7th grade Immunization Requirements

We must have a current record that shows the following vaccines have been received:

  • 1 dose of Meningococcal Vaccine (meningitis)
  • 2 doses of Varicella Vaccine (chicken pox)
  • 1 dose of Tdap Vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis)
  •  2 doses of Humanpapilloma virus (HPV) vaccine are suggested.

Please provide your shot record to the School nurse if your child has received these vaccines.  Your student will not be able to receive a schedule or attend school until the shots are received and written record is provided.

Texas Minimum State Vaccine Requirements for Students Grade K-12

Safe-T Forms

McKinney-Vinto/Homeless Support

“Homeless children and youth” refers to kids and teenagers who do not have a stable place to live at night. This includes those who are staying with other people because they lost their own homes, faced financial difficulties, or for similar reasons. It also includes those living in temporary places like motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds because they don’t have any other suitable options. Children and youth in emergency or transitional shelters, abandoned in hospitals, or waiting for foster care are also considered homeless.

Additionally, it includes children and youth who stay in public or private places not meant for regular sleeping, like parks, cars, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, or similar settings. Migratory children who meet the definition of homelessness outlined in section 1309 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 also fall under this category.

All McKinney Vento students have the right to immediate enrollment. A school must immediately enroll a homeless student, even if the student does not have the documents generally required for enrollment, such as academic and medical/immunization records or proof of residency. Once enrolled, the Homeless Education Liaison of the school must help the family obtain the necessary records and/or immunizations.

The right to choose what school to attend

  • Students have the right to continue attending their “school of origin.” The “school of origin” is the school where the child or youth was last enrolled or the school the child or youth was attending when s/he became homeless. The school district shall keep a student in the “school of origin” unless it goes against the parent’s wishes. The student also has the option of enrolling in the school where he is currently living.
  • If the parent requests the school, the district must provide the parent with a written explanation of the decision, which includes the right to appeal the decision.
  • The school district must make placement decisions based on the best interests of the student.
  • If the student obtains permanent housing during the school year, they have the right to stay in their current school until the end of the school year.

The right to transportation

  • The parent or guardian (or, in the case of an unaccompanied youth, the school homeless liaison) of a homeless student may request transportation be provided to and from school. If the student is still in the same district as the school of origin, the school district must provide transportation. If the student is not living within the district of the school of origin, the district of origin and the district where the student is living must determine how to share transportation costs and responsibilities. If the districts cannot come to an agreement, then the responsibility and costs must be shared equally. In general, transportation time should be limited to one hour or less in each direction.
  • Please note the transportation provisions of McKinney-Vento only apply to students who are currently homeless. If a student obtains permanent housing and continues to attend his/her school of origin until the end of the school year, the continued provision of transportation is at the discretion of the district of origin.
  • The right to participate in the same programs and activities as other students.
  • Homeless students have the same rights as all other students to participate in school nutrition, after-school, and special education programs.
  • Homeless students who qualify for special education services must be provided appropriate services based on the information that is available to the school. A school may not delay providing such services based on the non-receipt of school records. 

Under the Act, every school district is required to have a Homeless Education Liaison. It is the job of the Liaison to ensure that homeless students have the same opportunities as all other students, which includes ensuring that homeless students can attend school, set up free meals through nutrition services, arrange for transportation in a timely manner, keep the school staff informed of the rights of homeless students, and provide appropriate referrals to service providers. 

*This video is closed captioned in both English and Spanish. To activate the closed caption, click the “CC” icon and select your language*

  • How is homeless defined under McKinney-Vento?
    • Under the McKinney-Vento Act, the term “homeless children and youths” means individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence.
  • What living situation is considered homeless under McKinney-Vento?
    • Homeless children and youth who are:
      • Sharing the housing of others due to loss of housing or economic hardship;
      • Living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds;
      • Living in emergency or transitional shelters; and/or
      • Living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, or substandard housing.
  • What are the rights of students served under McKinney-Vento?
    • Receive a free, appropriate public education;
    • Enroll in school immediately, even if lacking documents normally required for enrollment;
    • Enroll in school and attend classes while the school works to gather the  important documents;
    • Enroll in the local school or continue attending their school of origin, if preferred;
    • Receive transportation to and from their school of origin; and 
    • Receive educational services comparable to those provided to other students, according to the students’ needs.
  • How are students and families identified within our district?
    • Students are identified via an online school enrollment form called a Student Residency Questionnaire. School staff, teachers, counselors, and even peers can often identify students who are experiencing homelessness through observations, conversations, or behavior changes. Additionally, families or students themselves may self-identify as homeless to school staff. After students are identified, students and their families (if available) will meet with the District’s Homeless Liaison to ensure each student meets the McKinney Vento definition of being homeless.
  • How long are students and families eligible to receive services?
    • Once it is determined that the student/family meets the homeless definition under McKinney-Vento, families are eligible to receive services through the SAFE-T program. These students remain eligible for the remainder of the school year, and eligibility is reassessed every school year to continue participation in the program.
  • Who are the designated campus staff providing services to students/families through the SAFE-T program?
    • The SAFE-T program team collaborates with campus staff and other departments to provide services and support as needed. The SAFE-T team campus assignments for each elementary, middle school, and high school can be found on our SAFE-T program homepage. 
  • How can students and families be referred for homeless assistance?

Unaccompanied Youth Support

The McKinney-Vento Act’s definition of unaccompanied youth [42 U.S.C. § 11434a(6)] includes youth who are “not in the physical custody of a parent or legal guardian.” In the context of education and homelessness, unaccompanied youth are individuals under the age of 18 not in the physical custody of a parent or legal guardian and lack a fixed, regular, and adequate night-time residence.

Unaccompanied youth may face challenging circumstances, such as being on their own due to family conflict, parental neglect or abandonment, escaping an abusive environment, or being forced to leave home for various reasons. They often find themselves without a stable place to live, relying on friends, extended family members, shelters, or other temporary accommodations.

Unaccompanied youth have the same rights and protections under the McKinney-Vento Act when it comes to enrolling in and attending schools, just as someone who is identified as homeless.

Foster Care Support

Under Texas law, foster care students may be identified as McKinney Vento / homeless students, depending on their placement by the Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS). These students are entitled to immediate enrollment when arriving at a new school or district — regardless of whether they have the necessary documentation and paperwork. Child Protective Services (CPS) caseworkers are required to enroll a child in school within three (3) school days of the child either: a) being placed in CPS custody; or b) moving to a new school or placement. The caseworker then has up to 30 days to provide all necessary enrollment paperwork to the new school. The District will follow up to ensure a student:

  • Has his or her records requested and received;
  • Is placed in the appropriate grade level and classes;
  • Receives his or her books; and
  • Receives special education services, if appropriate.

Texas Systems Working Together to Transform Education Outcomes of Students in Foster Care (PDF)

The following laws are identified in the Texas Education Code addressing students in foster care:

  • Data sharing and data collection requirements in PEIMS – TEC § 7.029 (Chapter 1 (PDF), p. 16; Chapter 5 (PDF), pgs. 45-46)
  • Immediate school enrollment without records – TEC § 25.002(g) (Chapter 7 (PDF), p. 56)
  • Attendance in the school the student was enrolled immediately before entering conservatorship, even when placed outside of the district attendance zone, until the student successfully completes the highest grade level offered by the school – TEC § 25.001(g) (Chapter 8 (PDF), p. 62)
  • Excused absences for court-ordered appointments – TEC § 25.087 (Chapter 10 (PDF), p. 75)
  • 11th or 12th grade student who transfers to a new school district and does not meet the graduation requirements of the new school district may request a diploma from the former school district, when on-track to graduate at the previous school – TEC § 28.025 (Chapter 9 (PDF), p. 92)
  • Free eligibility for PRE-K – TEC § 29.153(b)(6) (Chapter 10 (PDF), p. 74)
  • Accelerated instruction (at-risk indicators and compensatory education) – TEC § 29.081(d)(11) (Chapter 6 (PDF), p. 51; Chapter 11 (PDF), pgs. 82-83)
  • Free lifetime college tuition and fees waiver. The waiver is activated when a student enrolls in dual credit or another course where a student may earn college credit- TEC § 54.366 – (Chapter 13 (PDF), pgs. 104-106)
  • School districts and open-enrollment charter schools are required to appoint a Foster Care Liaison and notify TEA of their Foster Care Liaison appointment – TEC § 33.904 (Chapter 5 (PDF), p. 44)
  • Transition Assistance from one school to another of students in foster care – TEC § 25.007 (Chapter 11 (PDF), pgs. 84-91).
  • Who is in foster care?
    • The term foster care refers to all children and youth who are in the custody of the State of Texas due to abuse and/or neglect, regardless of their living arrangements.
  • How are students in foster care identified within our district?
    • Students are identified via the online enrollment process. If the guardian/caregiver replies “yes” to whether the student is in the conservatorship of DFPS, they are directed to provide a copy of the CPS Form 2085 to their campus staff. 
  • Who is the designated person on campus for collecting the CPS Form 2085?
    • The campus registrar or clerk obtains a copy of the CPS Form 2085 from the legal guardian during the enrollment process. 
  • Who is working with students in foster care and providing services?
    • School leadership and student services staff assigned to campuses collaborate with campus staff and other departments to provide the necessary support and services needed. 
  • What support and services are available for students in foster care?
    • Students in foster care are entitled to receive support to help maintain 
    • Educational stability, such as immediate enrollment, nutrition services, and transportation planning, as well as access to school-wide programs and transitional services for college and career options.

Post-secondary education for Foster students

Community Resources

View a detailed list of the many service available to help you and your family:

2023 Comal Community Resource Guide

Maria’s Closet
 407 W. Mill St
New Braunfels, TX 78130
 830-643-5736

First Footing Shelter (Adults)
1063 IH 35 
New Braunfels, TX 78130
830-312-8304

Connections Individual & Family Services, Inc. (Youth ages 5-18)
1414 W San Antonio St
New Braunfels, TX 78130

Crisis Center of Comal County (Survivors of Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault)
1547 E Common St
New Braunfels, TX 78130

Family Promise (Non-Emergency Shelter for Families with Children)
830-214-0024

SJRC-Texas – Foster Care Youth (Foster Care Youth Ages 5-21)
652 Old Bear Creek Rd
New Braunfels, TX 78130
830-629-0659

Southside Community Center (Adults)
518 S Guadalupe St
San Marcos, TX 78666
512-392-6694

Dental/Medical

New Braunfels Volunteers in Medicine
1195 W San Antonio St
New Braunfels, TX 
830-632-5131
New Braunfels Christian Ministries


Immunizations

Comal County Health Department
1297 Church Hill, Suite 102 
New Braunfels, TX 78130


Insurance

Medicaid/Chip


Prescription Assistance

Any Baby Can (Call to make appointment for NB office)
210-227-0170


Crisis Hotlines

Suicide Prevention

Domestic Violence/Sexual Abuse

Crisis Center of Comal County (Survivors of Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault)
830-620-7520

LGBTQ Support

LGBT National Help Center
888-843-4564

Mental Health

NOTE: These links are being provided as a convenience and for information purposes only; they do not constitute an endorsement or an approval by the New Braunfels Independent School District or the SAFE-T Program of any of the products, services, or opinions of the corporation, organization, or individual. The New Braunfels Independent School District and the SAFE-T program bear no responsibility for the accuracy, legality, or content of the external site or for that of subsequent links. Contact the external site for answers to questions regarding its content. 

Student Resources

  • School House Connection Youth Leadership and Scholarship Program: Helping You Get To and Through Higher Education
  • Big Future: Finding colleges and careers that are right for you doesn’t have to be stressful. Sign in for help planning for life after high school.
  • Types of Federal Aid: Check out this video to learn about federal grants, loans, and work-study jobs and how they can help fund your education. (captioning is available in English and Spanish; just start the video and click on the cc symbol at the bottom.) 
  • FAFSA: Federal Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and Youth Homeless
  • FASFA Application Form: Use the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FASFA) form to apply for financial aid for college or graduate school.
  • TheDream.Us: If you are a dreamer, we can help you realize your dream of a college education.
  • MALDEF Scholarship Resource Guide: The MALDEF Scholarship Resource Guide is a free, informative resource guide for students, parents, and educators with an extensive list of scholarships, including many that do not inquire about immigration status. 
  • Scholarships for Undocumented Students
  • Peterson’s Scholarship Search Engine: Find the right scholarship, grant, or award for you. Click here to learn more.  Your source for career exploration, training & jobs. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • UNIGO Scholarship Search Engine: One of the best ways to find opportunities.
  • UNIGO Scholarship Match: Browse through our categories  or use their match tool. Enter your basic info, such as your academic interests, location and grade level and UNIGO will generate a list of awards that fit your individual profile. 
  • NCES (National Center for Education Statistics): Did you know there are thousands of college scholarships you can apply for? In fact, according to NCES, on average, students at 4-year colleges are awarded $9,740 in grants and scholarships each year.
  • Career One Stop: Your source for career exploration, training & jobs. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Golden Door Scholars: Status doesn’t determine opportunity. Tenacity and hard work do. Undocumented students invest in their education and define their future.
  • Click here for additional scholarship resources. 
  • College Board: College board is the nation’s largest college-going organization, helping millions of students navigate the transition from high school to college each year through programs like the SAT, aAP p, and Big Future.
  • ACT Test: Texas student – unlock your potential!
  • Free SAT Prep

Staff Resources

Student Services

The Department of Student Services provides a variety of support programs for NBISD students and their families.

Matthew DeLoach

Chief of Schools – LCHS Feeder Pattern
830-643-5704

Wade Ivy

Chief of Schools – NBHS Feeder Pattern
830-643-5704

Handbooks

Feeder Patterns

  • County Line Elementary School
  • Klein Road Elementary School
  • Memorial Elementary School
  • Voss Farms Elementary School
  • Walnut Springs Elementary School
  • New Braunfels Middle School
  • Long Creek High School
  • Carl Schurz Elementary School
  • Lamar Elementary School
  • Seele Elementary School
  • Veramendi Elementary School
  • Oak Run Middle School
  • New Braunfels High School

Shared campuses from both feeder patterns

  • Lone Star Early Childhood Center
  • School of Choice
  • DAEP

Department Functions

  • Scorecard Development and Support
  • Coaching 1:1
  • Support of Principal Collaboration Opportunities
  • Operational Leadership Meetings
  • TPESS Texas Principal Evaluation and Support Systems
    • Goal Setting
  • Onboarding and mentoring support to new to district staff in School Leadership and Student Services
  • Customer Service Support for Parents, Community Members, Staff
  • Assistant Principal Support
  • Discipline/Student Supportive Measures
  • Staff Development
  • Investigations
  • Grievances
  • Attendance/ Registration/ Enrollment
  • Community Partnerships

The Student Services department oversees the following areas:

  • Athletics
  • Counseling
  • Health Services
  • Restorative Discipline Team
  • School Safety

Maria’s Closet

Open to all families in need of school supplies, backpacks, & new/gently used clothing.

Maria Cendejas-Alcala

407 W. Mill St.,
New Braunfels, TX 78130
830-643-5736

Tuesday – Friday
9am – 12pm
1pm – 3pm

School Supply Donations Needed:

  • Glue sticks
  • Crayons (24 count)
  • Prong plastic folders with pockets in solid colors (avoid black)
  • Tray of water colors (8 count)
  • Bottles of glue (4 ounce)
  • Metal scissors (pointed)
  • Package highlighters
  • Composition books
  • Wide-ruled notebook paper
  • Color pencils
  • Large pink eraser
  • Tennis shoes
  • Boys and girls backpacks for Kinder to Fifth Grade

NBISD Safe-T Program

Our program works with students and families meeting criteria for the McKinney-Vento Act implemented to ensure all students have the right to an education regardless of their living situation. The McKinney-Vento Act is a federal law that provides services to these students. The program provides services to help these students immediately enroll in school and have equitable access to education and opportunities for success.

Program Goals

  • To be able to provide services to an increasing number of NBISD students under the McKinney-Vento Act.
  • Maintain partnerships with our many community resource collaborators.
  • Align service strategies that are student-centered and designed to best meet the academic needs of students, ensuring they reach their full potential.

Our Mission

The mission of  SAFE-T is to discover the full potential of transitioning students by engaging, empowering, and inspiring them through educational support, stability, and barrier-breaking tools.

If your family is currently living in transition due to economic hardship, a natural disaster, fire, loss of housing, job loss, or any other life-altering situation, please contact the SAFE-T team to locate resources to best assist you and your child.

Help make a difference in our community:
Volunteer Now!

SAFE-T Team

Maria Alcala
District Homeless/Foster Liaison
830-643-5736
 
Rosalie Rosales
SAFE-T Program, Dropout Prevention
830-627-6013
 
Jennifer Martin
Homeless Identification Specialist
830-643-5797

SAFE-T FAQ

How to Keep Your Child Healthy and Happy

One of the most important lessons a child can learn is how to lead a healthy life.

  • Provide a balanced diet with healthy snacks. Breakfast is a good start!
  • Provide adequate rest, sleep and exercise.
  • Teach good personal hygiene. Wash hands with soap and water often.
  • Be aware of his or her developmental milestones and maturity.
  • Make sure your child has regular medical and eye check-ups and scheduled immunizations. Visit the Dentist.
  • Provide protection and firm, consistent discipline but encourage independence.
  • Listen to your child and help him or her handle stress, worry, loneliness, anger – these may cause headaches, stomachaches and sleeplessness, and may lead to depression or other illnesses.
  • Consult your physician for any special needs or concerns.

Give lots of Tender Loving Care!

School Health Screening Programs Conducted in NBISD:

  • Texas Risk Assessment for Type II Diabetes in Children: Grades 1,3,5,7
  • Vision Screening: Grades PK, K, 1, 3, 5, 7 & new students
  • Hearing Screening: Grades PK, K, 1, 3, 5, 7 & new students
  • Spinal Screening: Grades 5 girls, 7th grade girls and 8th grade boys

The school nurse will notify the parents if a problem is identified in any of the screenings. Should you need any information or assistance concerning your child’s health, development and/or screening, please call the nurse at your child’s school.

A student shall show acceptable evidence of vaccination prior to entry, attendance, or transfer to a child-care facility or public or private elementary or secondary school in Texas.

Students entering 7th grade Immunization Requirements

We must have a current record that shows the following vaccines have been received:

  • 1 dose of Meningococcal Vaccine (meningitis)
  • 2 doses of Varicella Vaccine (chicken pox)
  • 1 dose of Tdap Vaccine (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis)
  •  2 doses of Humanpapilloma virus (HPV) vaccine are suggested.

Please provide your shot record to the School nurse if your child has received these vaccines.  Your student will not be able to receive a schedule or attend school until the shots are received and written record is provided.

Texas Minimum State Vaccine Requirements for Students Grade K-12

McKinney-Vinto/Homeless Support

“Homeless children and youth” refers to kids and teenagers who do not have a stable place to live at night. This includes those who are staying with other people because they lost their own homes, faced financial difficulties, or for similar reasons. It also includes those living in temporary places like motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds because they don’t have any other suitable options. Children and youth in emergency or transitional shelters, abandoned in hospitals, or waiting for foster care are also considered homeless.

Additionally, it includes children and youth who stay in public or private places not meant for regular sleeping, like parks, cars, abandoned buildings, substandard housing, bus or train stations, or similar settings. Migratory children who meet the definition of homelessness outlined in section 1309 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 also fall under this category.

All McKinney Vento students have the right to immediate enrollment. A school must immediately enroll a homeless student, even if the student does not have the documents generally required for enrollment, such as academic and medical/immunization records or proof of residency. Once enrolled, the Homeless Education Liaison of the school must help the family obtain the necessary records and/or immunizations.

The right to choose what school to attend

  • Students have the right to continue attending their “school of origin.” The “school of origin” is the school where the child or youth was last enrolled or the school the child or youth was attending when s/he became homeless. The school district shall keep a student in the “school of origin” unless it goes against the parent’s wishes. The student also has the option of enrolling in the school where he is currently living.
  • If the parent requests the school, the district must provide the parent with a written explanation of the decision, which includes the right to appeal the decision.
  • The school district must make placement decisions based on the best interests of the student.
  • If the student obtains permanent housing during the school year, they have the right to stay in their current school until the end of the school year.

The right to transportation

  • The parent or guardian (or, in the case of an unaccompanied youth, the school homeless liaison) of a homeless student may request transportation be provided to and from school. If the student is still in the same district as the school of origin, the school district must provide transportation. If the student is not living within the district of the school of origin, the district of origin and the district where the student is living must determine how to share transportation costs and responsibilities. If the districts cannot come to an agreement, then the responsibility and costs must be shared equally. In general, transportation time should be limited to one hour or less in each direction.
  • Please note the transportation provisions of McKinney-Vento only apply to students who are currently homeless. If a student obtains permanent housing and continues to attend his/her school of origin until the end of the school year, the continued provision of transportation is at the discretion of the district of origin.
  • The right to participate in the same programs and activities as other students.
  • Homeless students have the same rights as all other students to participate in school nutrition, after-school, and special education programs.
  • Homeless students who qualify for special education services must be provided appropriate services based on the information that is available to the school. A school may not delay providing such services based on the non-receipt of school records. 

Under the Act, every school district is required to have a Homeless Education Liaison. It is the job of the Liaison to ensure that homeless students have the same opportunities as all other students, which includes ensuring that homeless students can attend school, set up free meals through nutrition services, arrange for transportation in a timely manner, keep the school staff informed of the rights of homeless students, and provide appropriate referrals to service providers. 

*This video is closed captioned in both English and Spanish. To activate the closed caption, click the “CC” icon and select your language*

  • How is homeless defined under McKinney-Vento?
    • Under the McKinney-Vento Act, the term “homeless children and youths” means individuals who lack a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence.
  • What living situation is considered homeless under McKinney-Vento?
    • Homeless children and youth who are:
      • Sharing the housing of others due to loss of housing or economic hardship;
      • Living in motels, hotels, trailer parks, or camping grounds;
      • Living in emergency or transitional shelters; and/or
      • Living in cars, parks, public spaces, abandoned buildings, or substandard housing.
  • What are the rights of students served under McKinney-Vento?
    • Receive a free, appropriate public education;
    • Enroll in school immediately, even if lacking documents normally required for enrollment;
    • Enroll in school and attend classes while the school works to gather the  important documents;
    • Enroll in the local school or continue attending their school of origin, if preferred;
    • Receive transportation to and from their school of origin; and 
    • Receive educational services comparable to those provided to other students, according to the students’ needs.
  • How are students and families identified within our district?
    • Students are identified via an online school enrollment form called a Student Residency Questionnaire. School staff, teachers, counselors, and even peers can often identify students who are experiencing homelessness through observations, conversations, or behavior changes. Additionally, families or students themselves may self-identify as homeless to school staff. After students are identified, students and their families (if available) will meet with the District’s Homeless Liaison to ensure each student meets the McKinney Vento definition of being homeless.
  • How long are students and families eligible to receive services?
    • Once it is determined that the student/family meets the homeless definition under McKinney-Vento, families are eligible to receive services through the SAFE-T program. These students remain eligible for the remainder of the school year, and eligibility is reassessed every school year to continue participation in the program.
  • Who are the designated campus staff providing services to students/families through the SAFE-T program?
    • The SAFE-T program team collaborates with campus staff and other departments to provide services and support as needed. The SAFE-T team campus assignments for each elementary, middle school, and high school can be found on our SAFE-T program homepage. 
  • How can students and families be referred for homeless assistance?

Unaccompanied Youth Support

The McKinney-Vento Act’s definition of unaccompanied youth [42 U.S.C. § 11434a(6)] includes youth who are “not in the physical custody of a parent or legal guardian.” In the context of education and homelessness, unaccompanied youth are individuals under the age of 18 not in the physical custody of a parent or legal guardian and lack a fixed, regular, and adequate night-time residence.

Unaccompanied youth may face challenging circumstances, such as being on their own due to family conflict, parental neglect or abandonment, escaping an abusive environment, or being forced to leave home for various reasons. They often find themselves without a stable place to live, relying on friends, extended family members, shelters, or other temporary accommodations.

Unaccompanied youth have the same rights and protections under the McKinney-Vento Act when it comes to enrolling in and attending schools, just as someone who is identified as homeless.

Foster Care Support

Under Texas law, foster care students may be identified as McKinney Vento / homeless students, depending on their placement by the Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS). These students are entitled to immediate enrollment when arriving at a new school or district — regardless of whether they have the necessary documentation and paperwork. Child Protective Services (CPS) caseworkers are required to enroll a child in school within three (3) school days of the child either: a) being placed in CPS custody; or b) moving to a new school or placement. The caseworker then has up to 30 days to provide all necessary enrollment paperwork to the new school. The District will follow up to ensure a student:

  • Has his or her records requested and received;
  • Is placed in the appropriate grade level and classes;
  • Receives his or her books; and
  • Receives special education services, if appropriate.

Texas Systems Working Together to Transform Education Outcomes of Students in Foster Care (PDF)

The following laws are identified in the Texas Education Code addressing students in foster care:

  • Data sharing and data collection requirements in PEIMS – TEC § 7.029 (Chapter 1 (PDF), p. 16; Chapter 5 (PDF), pgs. 45-46)
  • Immediate school enrollment without records – TEC § 25.002(g) (Chapter 7 (PDF), p. 56)
  • Attendance in the school the student was enrolled immediately before entering conservatorship, even when placed outside of the district attendance zone, until the student successfully completes the highest grade level offered by the school – TEC § 25.001(g) (Chapter 8 (PDF), p. 62)
  • Excused absences for court-ordered appointments – TEC § 25.087 (Chapter 10 (PDF), p. 75)
  • 11th or 12th grade student who transfers to a new school district and does not meet the graduation requirements of the new school district may request a diploma from the former school district, when on-track to graduate at the previous school – TEC § 28.025 (Chapter 9 (PDF), p. 92)
  • Free eligibility for PRE-K – TEC § 29.153(b)(6) (Chapter 10 (PDF), p. 74)
  • Accelerated instruction (at-risk indicators and compensatory education) – TEC § 29.081(d)(11) (Chapter 6 (PDF), p. 51; Chapter 11 (PDF), pgs. 82-83)
  • Free lifetime college tuition and fees waiver. The waiver is activated when a student enrolls in dual credit or another course where a student may earn college credit- TEC § 54.366 – (Chapter 13 (PDF), pgs. 104-106)
  • School districts and open-enrollment charter schools are required to appoint a Foster Care Liaison and notify TEA of their Foster Care Liaison appointment – TEC § 33.904 (Chapter 5 (PDF), p. 44)
  • Transition Assistance from one school to another of students in foster care – TEC § 25.007 (Chapter 11 (PDF), pgs. 84-91).
  • Who is in foster care?
    • The term foster care refers to all children and youth who are in the custody of the State of Texas due to abuse and/or neglect, regardless of their living arrangements.
  • How are students in foster care identified within our district?
    • Students are identified via the online enrollment process. If the guardian/caregiver replies “yes” to whether the student is in the conservatorship of DFPS, they are directed to provide a copy of the CPS Form 2085 to their campus staff. 
  • Who is the designated person on campus for collecting the CPS Form 2085?
    • The campus registrar or clerk obtains a copy of the CPS Form 2085 from the legal guardian during the enrollment process. 
  • Who is working with students in foster care and providing services?
    • School leadership and student services staff assigned to campuses collaborate with campus staff and other departments to provide the necessary support and services needed. 
  • What support and services are available for students in foster care?
    • Students in foster care are entitled to receive support to help maintain 
    • Educational stability, such as immediate enrollment, nutrition services, and transportation planning, as well as access to school-wide programs and transitional services for college and career options.

Post-secondary education for Foster students

Community Resources

View a detailed list of the many service available to help you and your family:

2023 Comal Community Resource Guide

Maria’s Closet
 407 W. Mill St
New Braunfels, TX 78130
 830-643-5736

First Footing Shelter (Adults)
1063 IH 35 
New Braunfels, TX 78130
830-312-8304

Connections Individual & Family Services, Inc. (Youth ages 5-18)
1414 W San Antonio St
New Braunfels, TX 78130

Crisis Center of Comal County (Survivors of Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault)
1547 E Common St
New Braunfels, TX 78130

Family Promise (Non-Emergency Shelter for Families with Children)
830-214-0024

SJRC-Texas – Foster Care Youth (Foster Care Youth Ages 5-21)
652 Old Bear Creek Rd
New Braunfels, TX 78130
830-629-0659

Southside Community Center (Adults)
518 S Guadalupe St
San Marcos, TX 78666
512-392-6694

Dental/Medical

New Braunfels Volunteers in Medicine
1195 W San Antonio St
New Braunfels, TX 
830-632-5131
New Braunfels Christian Ministries


Immunizations

Comal County Health Department
1297 Church Hill, Suite 102 
New Braunfels, TX 78130


Insurance

Medicaid/Chip


Prescription Assistance

Any Baby Can (Call to make appointment for NB office)
210-227-0170


Crisis Hotlines

Suicide Prevention

Domestic Violence/Sexual Abuse

Crisis Center of Comal County (Survivors of Domestic Violence & Sexual Assault)
830-620-7520

LGBTQ Support

LGBT National Help Center
888-843-4564

Mental Health

NOTE: These links are being provided as a convenience and for information purposes only; they do not constitute an endorsement or an approval by the New Braunfels Independent School District or the SAFE-T Program of any of the products, services, or opinions of the corporation, organization, or individual. The New Braunfels Independent School District and the SAFE-T program bear no responsibility for the accuracy, legality, or content of the external site or for that of subsequent links. Contact the external site for answers to questions regarding its content. 

Student Resources

  • School House Connection Youth Leadership and Scholarship Program: Helping You Get To and Through Higher Education
  • Big Future: Finding colleges and careers that are right for you doesn’t have to be stressful. Sign in for help planning for life after high school.
  • Types of Federal Aid: Check out this video to learn about federal grants, loans, and work-study jobs and how they can help fund your education. (captioning is available in English and Spanish; just start the video and click on the cc symbol at the bottom.) 
  • FAFSA: Federal Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) and Youth Homeless
  • FASFA Application Form: Use the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FASFA) form to apply for financial aid for college or graduate school.
  • TheDream.Us: If you are a dreamer, we can help you realize your dream of a college education.
  • MALDEF Scholarship Resource Guide: The MALDEF Scholarship Resource Guide is a free, informative resource guide for students, parents, and educators with an extensive list of scholarships, including many that do not inquire about immigration status. 
  • Scholarships for Undocumented Students
  • Peterson’s Scholarship Search Engine: Find the right scholarship, grant, or award for you. Click here to learn more.  Your source for career exploration, training & jobs. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • UNIGO Scholarship Search Engine: One of the best ways to find opportunities.
  • UNIGO Scholarship Match: Browse through our categories  or use their match tool. Enter your basic info, such as your academic interests, location and grade level and UNIGO will generate a list of awards that fit your individual profile. 
  • NCES (National Center for Education Statistics): Did you know there are thousands of college scholarships you can apply for? In fact, according to NCES, on average, students at 4-year colleges are awarded $9,740 in grants and scholarships each year.
  • Career One Stop: Your source for career exploration, training & jobs. Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Labor.
  • Golden Door Scholars: Status doesn’t determine opportunity. Tenacity and hard work do. Undocumented students invest in their education and define their future.
  • Click here for additional scholarship resources. 
  • College Board: College board is the nation’s largest college-going organization, helping millions of students navigate the transition from high school to college each year through programs like the SAT, aAP p, and Big Future.
  • ACT Test: Texas student – unlock your potential!
  • Free SAT Prep